Newer Gods

Spoken myths tell
The truth of fallen worlds
Apocalyptic disasters
Sealed in Time’s capsule
An open Pandora’s box
Blows the last storm
In our hapless faces
We kneel in obeisance
When darkness unfolds
For we brazenly ignored
All our History ever told
In human laments and curses
Newer Gods are born

Heaven and Hell

As a life-long student of history, I know every chapter resounds with the story of Heaven and Hell!

Ambition prophesied
Madness was not
Kingdom in sight
But hell it brought
Murder, malice
Truckloads of lies
A slice of heaven
Promised delight
All for naught
Power unchecked,
A tragedy wrought!

______________________________

Kings can’t smother
Smolders of a revolution
For when men burn,
Sparks reach heaven
Ashes color hell
A world rebels
For those who suffer
So history tells

Let History Be

Globally, when regimes and political philosophy change, history comes under onslaught. Rewritten, revised, reinterpreted to suit the flavor of the realm. Historical sites are often the target of either misdirected rage or unsolicited renovation. Some soils are colored by the blood of martyrs, some hallways still echo with horrors, some passages are still raw open wounds, and the air of some places still heavy with captive souls.

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Book Review: The Emperor who Vanished

The book has good font size, smooth language, and dives into anecdotes and information from history, art, and architecture. A great memory refresher for adults with a few new facts and a wonderful book to make the children interested in our rich history, monuments, and the wonders of ancient times! I recommend this book for 10 years and above readers and even as a bedtime read for younger children.

Now, that I am building my 11-year old son’s library, I am getting to read some great children’s/young adult fiction, and rediscovering forgotten facts. Kavitha Mandana’s The Emperor who Vanished is a book that introduces Indian history, art, and architecture in an interesting manner. This book is relevant for children in middle school because this is the time they are discovering more about India’s rich heritage and culture in their school curriculum.

The book has good font size, smooth language, and dives into anecdotes and information from history, art, and architecture. A great memory refresher for adults with a few additional facts and a wonderful book to make the children interested in our rich history, monuments, and the wonders of ancient times! I recommend this book for 10 years and above readers and even as a bedtime read for younger children.

Rating – 4/5. A star less because my son did not enjoy the fictional bit about the two students embarking on a school project. I also felt the language was not taut in those sections. The characters were not flushed out and the attempt to create a funny and engaging storyline was not exactly accomplished. Even without focussing on the story of Apu and Nina, the book is worth a read.

Book Review: The Great Indian Novel

An Exercise in Self-Indulgence or a Supremely Intellectual Modern Satire

While going through a spate of reading mythological literature and fiction, I came across Amazon’s recommendation to read Shashi Tharoor’s The Great Indian Novel. Curiosity made me purchase the novel and few pages into the book I was recommending it to all readers with similar book interests. The intricacies of word play and the liberal usage of intelligent pun made this a humorous and enthralling read. It stands high on the pedestal of a modern satire and is impressive.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Great Indian Novel”
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