Book Review: The Eight Crafts of Writing

The Eight Crafts of Writing by Stefan Emunds is a must-have on the bookshelf for anyone who wants a succinct reckoner for basic principles of good writing.

Book Review: Inauspicicous

Book: Inauspicious Author: Renée L. K. Eastabrooks Genre: Contemporary Fiction Review Copy: Reedsy Available at: Amazon.com Some aspects of our society and cultural mores are so horrifying that we strive to keep them under wraps. It takes someone with courage, compassion, and empathy to bring forth depraved secrets so that the evil can be rippedContinue reading “Book Review: Inauspicicous”

Book Review: Espresso with the Devil

Book: Espresso with the Devil Author: Thomas Poppe Genre: Fiction, Self-Discovery, New-Age Review Copy: Reedsy Available on: Amazon.in Must Read! A title as interesting as Espresso with the Devil keeps up to its promise of being an engrossing read. Tom, a writer, is approached at the airport, by Fred, who introduces himself as the Devil.Continue reading “Book Review: Espresso with the Devil”

Book Review: The Nonchalant Man Between Worlds

Quite a few stories are narrative in style, imageries piling up, increasingly reflecting the complexity of perceptions. Chan clearly questions, “Has the world always been like this, both insane and chaotic, only he has not seen it as it actually is until now?” This is the theme of the book. Anguished ponderings on the chaos in our minds, purpose, and meaning of our lives, as we try to find a place as friends, lovers, and social beings.

Book Review: Bombay Hangovers

The fragility of the aged, raciness of the illicit, achiness of nostalgia and aging bones, the darkness of lust, tender cares of motherhood, the inevitability of fading youth, travails of escapism, and troubled demons of haunted pasts – each story is woven to create an elaborate tapestry.

Book Review: Sober Thoughts from the Crazy House

The words flow, each better than the next, sometimes rhyming, sometimes like the churning of an ocean, thoughts dripping from every nook, every crevice. Each thought more relatable than the next, some philosophical, some mundane but the currents strong enough to wash you away.

Wadda Beparwah – The Great Uncaring One

Khushwant Singh observed, “Most men and women who deny God are to my knowledge more truthful, helpful, kinder and more considerate in their dealings with others that men of religion.” He was trying to probably say that lack of bigotry, fanaticism, and single-minded devotion to a God or a religion made people more open to accept the concepts of brotherhood and goodness of the human.

Book Review: Yuganta, The End of an Epoch

I was drawn to this book primarily because of its name – Yuganta. The word carries a musical, soulful mystery – it is romantic, it speaks of history in gigantic (end of an epoch) terms, it promises insight into one of the greatest epics of Indian literature and religion – the Mahabharata. Iravati Karve’s bookContinue reading “Book Review: Yuganta, The End of an Epoch”