Reedsy Discovery – A Platform for Indie Publishing

Today, I started reading my first book in the Reedsy Discovery book review community. Reedsy is a British startup online author services firm promoting collaboration between authors and publishing freelancers in the self-publishing industry. Discovery, puts a spotlight on the best works of the Independent (indie) publishing world — great books that are often overshadowed by big bestsellers.

Reedsy

As a reviewer, I have full access to the Reedsy Discovery library of advanced review copies (ARCs) and other member perks. Hundreds of authors have submitted their books for discovery. I have access to the submissions pool and can read and review books before they launch.

I hope to guide the writing and reading community by spotting new trends and deciding which books Discovery recommends for its 200k readers. Not all writers get big publishing contracts, not all big house publications are great. A lot of talent lies in Indie publishing. I am privileged to help these writers in my own small way; I am proud to support independent publishing.

The Editorial Manager of this platform contacted me after reading my blog. My blog, in its previous avatar, and now with a new URL, has always brought me fantastic writing and reading opportunities. I am glad to read and review more books. I hope can identify some good work. As the Reedsy Discovery site for reviewers says: The best books go undiscovered, be part of the movement that shines a light on them.

I can write reviews as often as I like and they will appear in the Discovery newsletters to readers. I will also share book reviews on this blog. The first book I started reading today is an engaging story about magic in the life of a Creole girl. I am sure this will be an exciting journey.

Book Review: The Emperor who Vanished

The book has good font size, smooth language, and dives into anecdotes and information from history, art, and architecture. A great memory refresher for adults with a few new facts and a wonderful book to make the children interested in our rich history, monuments, and the wonders of ancient times! I recommend this book for 10 years and above readers and even as a bedtime read for younger children.

Now, that I am building my 11-year old son’s library, I am getting to read some great children’s/young adult fiction, and rediscovering forgotten facts. Kavitha Mandana’s The Emperor who Vanished is a book that introduces Indian history, art, and architecture in an interesting manner. This book is relevant for children in middle school because this is the time they are discovering more about India’s rich heritage and culture in their school curriculum.

The book has good font size, smooth language, and dives into anecdotes and information from history, art, and architecture. A great memory refresher for adults with a few additional facts and a wonderful book to make the children interested in our rich history, monuments, and the wonders of ancient times! I recommend this book for 10 years and above readers and even as a bedtime read for younger children.

Rating – 4/5. A star less because my son did not enjoy the fictional bit about the two students embarking on a school project. I also felt the language was not taut in those sections. The characters were not flushed out and the attempt to create a funny and engaging storyline was not exactly accomplished. Even without focussing on the story of Apu and Nina, the book is worth a read.

Book Review: Yuganta, The End of an Epoch

Yuganta

I was drawn to this book primarily because of its name – Yuganta. The word carries a musical, soulful mystery – it is romantic, it speaks of history in gigantic (end of an epoch) terms, it promises insight into one of the greatest epics of Indian literature and religion – the Mahabharata.

Iravati Karve’s book is a storehouse of scientific and historical enquiry, of years of study and research, and deep-felt insight into the characters and the times of the Mahabharata. I confess to have found more than I had hoped for in this paperback. The Mahabharata was essentially a treatise of the life and times of certain people. It was a story told by ‘sutas’ or court bards, and further embellished by latter Brahmans and sutas, to make it an ever-growing epic.

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Book Review: The Great Indian Novel

An Exercise in Self-Indulgence or a Supremely Intellectual Modern Satire

While going through a spate of reading mythological literature and fiction, I came across Amazon’s recommendation to read Shashi Tharoor’s The Great Indian Novel. Curiosity made me purchase the novel and few pages into the book I was recommending it to all readers with similar book interests. The intricacies of word play and the liberal usage of intelligent pun made this a humorous and enthralling read. It stands high on the pedestal of a modern satire and is impressive.

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Book Review: Displacement and Desolation in Perumal Murugan’s Characters

When you don’t feel belonged, you are isolated, lonely, and then the voices in the head become larger than life, and the fine line between the real and the perceived diminishes.

The short story is a strong but difficult medium. In many ways it is more potent than a novel because it can leave an impact with few words, consuming little time. An observant writer can concoct many stories using everyday themes and images, telling extraordinary tales about ordinary people, evoking emotions and reactions from a diverse readership. In the preface to The Goat Thief, prolific Tamil short story writer, Perumal Murugan, talks about his own tryst with the skill of story writing and how he came to evolve his own style and rendition.

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